"Things that you would never have to put up with in an everyday job, for some reason when you're in the air, it suddenly ...

“Things that you would never have to put up with in an everyday job, for some reason when you’re in the air, it suddenly becomes the norm,” says former flight attendant.

With the number of arrests for drunken air behaviour on the rise, flight attendants have to deal with more than you can imagine.

Being sworn at, vomited on and touched inappropriately has become commonplace, according to a former flight attendant who is calling for alcohol to be moderated at the airport.

And it’s not the “stereotypical guy on a stag do,” British woman Ally Murphy says.

“They were with seemingly normal, nice people who had taken the offer of a free shot of liquor in the duty free shop, had a few pints with their pre-flight meal, and enjoyed a few more tipples on board,” Murphy, who worked in the industry for 14 years, wrote in a recent article for The Guardian.

Budget airline Ryanair is calling on British airports to curb alcohol sales following sharp increases in the number of ...

Budget airline Ryanair is calling on British airports to curb alcohol sales following sharp increases in the number of incidents involving disruptive passengers.

“I have been sworn at, threatened, vomited on, touched inappropriately, had hands up my skirt, and physically pulled into an upper-class seat by an enamoured drunken young man.”

The column, in which she shared various horror stories, was published ahead of a programme that looked at the rise of drunken air incidents.

According to Panorama programme the number of arrests for drunken air behaviour has increased by 50 per cent, with 380 arrests in the UK over the past year.

“Things that you would never have to put up with in an everyday job, for some reason when you’re in the air, it suddenly becomes the norm,” Murphy told the BBC on August 14.

CALL TO CURB ALCOHOL

Meanwhile, budget airline Ryanair is calling on British airports to curb alcohol sales following sharp increases in the number of incidents involving disruptive passengers.

The carrier issued a statement Monday calling for a ban on alcohol sales before 10am and for limiting the number of drinks in bars and restaurants to a maximum of two.

The airline cited Civil Aviation Authority statistics showing a 600 per cent increase in disruptive incidents between 2012-2016 and said most involved alcohol.

Ryanair’s Kenny Jacobs says it’s unfair “that airports can profit from the unlimited sale of alcohol to passengers and leave the airlines to deal with the safety consequences.”

The airline says it has taken steps to prevent disruptive behaviour on its flights, including preventing consumption of duty-free alcohol purchases on board.